INTERLEUKIN 2

Interleukin-2 | IL2

  • Interleukin-2 (IL2), also called T-cell growth factor and primarily produced by antigen-activated T cells, is a kind of lymphoid factor with immunoregulatory effect which can promote T-cell-dependent immune responses.

  • IL-2 was first used as a therapeutic approach to boost immune responses in patients with invasive cancer or advanced HIV disease.

  • IL-2 signal plays a key role in promoting the development, homeostasis and the function of the regulatory T cells. The deletion of IL-2 in vivo causes T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases. Now it is being considered as a kind of medicine inhibiting immune responses. Further studies with controlled clinical trials will be needed to prove the potential of IL-2 as a therapeutic strategy for autoimmune diseases.

  • The decreased production of IL-2 in patients with autoimmune disease leads to immune defects, such as decreased production of Treg cells, decreased AICD and cytotoxicity. Combination therapy based on IL-2 may prove to be beneficial in curing the immunological disorders.

  • IL-2 signal plays a key role in promoting development, homeostasis and function of regulatory T cells. IL-2 affects multiple signal pathways, and its deficiency causes the multifacted dysregulation of immune response.

  • The decreased production of IL-2 in patients with autoimmune disease triggers various immune defects, such as decreased production of Treg cells, decreased AICD and decreased cytotoxicity of CTL. The decreased cytotoxicity of CTL would make patients more susceptible to intracellular infection. Therefore, to ensure the amount and function of IL-2 may help to realize the potential of IL-2 as an immunotherapeutic effect and ensure clinical application of IL-2.

Interleukin-2 and autoimmune disease occurrence and therapy

  • IL-2 has been in clinical trials for the treatment of chronic viral infections, and as a booster (adjuvant) for vaccines. The use of large doses of IL-2 given every 6–8 weeks in HIV therapy, similar to its use in cancer therapy, was found to be ineffective in preventing progression to an AIDS diagnosis in two large clinical trials published in 2009